By Andrea Zanetich

Like the rest of the world, I couldn’t wait to see Kate, William, and the new Royal Baby emerge from the hospital last week, and the sight didn’t disappoint. It was a great show. She was glowing, he was grinning, the baby was delicious, and don’t tell me I was the only one who thought her hair looked amazing?!

But what stuck with me most was that Kate still looked pregnant.

Kate-Middleton-Jenny-Packham-Dress-Leaving-Hospital

 

Kate unashamedly refused to hide her still-swollen bump last week in front of the world’s media. It was such a refreshing change from the traditional approach taken by celebrities, who usually distribute carefully orchestrated, skillfully photo-shopped post-birth imagery that’s focused exclusively on the top half of their bodies.

If you’ve already had kids, the fact that our bodies still look pregnant after we deliver our babies would come as no surprise. But many women still don’t realise that this is another normal stage of pregnancy; it’s just that the post-birth body is rarely showcased to the world. And so for many mums (myself included!), it’s usually a shock when you pull down those sheets in the maternity ward to check out your post-birth belly, only to find that it still looks like there’s a baby tucked up inside.

I reckon Kate’s appearance will go a long way towards a step-change in thinking, and hopefully an increase in body acceptance and love for us all.

In a society where the pregnant body is considered beautiful, and a slender body is considered beautiful, it’s time that we recognise that a post-baby body is beautiful too. After all, giving birth is the most amazing thing a woman’s body can do.

 

I chatted about this on the radio last week, here’s the link:

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To see what real mummy tummies look like click HERE, and for ideas of what to wear in those few months after you give birth click HERE.

 

How did you feel about your body in those days after giving birth? 

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13 Comments

  • I remember looking in the mirror a few days after giving birth, sure that I wasn’t going to like what I saw — and finding that, instead of being grossed out, I was just amazed at the feat my body had accomplished. Also, after having lugged around a huge, hard bump for months, I felt amazingly thin for that first week or two. (That feeling passed very, very quickly)

  • I agree i love how real and natural she is 🙂 it’s what young girls need to see:) i also looked like her after i gave birth 🙂 even 6 months on i still got asked when was i due . Your body takes 9 months to grow a baby and takes a few months to go back to normal after . go Kate for being a normal beautiful mum 🙂

  • I wonder if it was planned or was the dress chosen without realising how much her tummy would show through? She looked gorgeous either way x

    • I think everything Kate does is planned with precision. I don’t think it was an accident that she was dressed this way – it does great things for her image (and for the royals) for her to appear approachable.

  • I thought when she came out she looked stunning and given I left the hospital in my pj’s I was impressed, But I was most impressed like you in not hiding the remainder bump. It was so lovely to see.

  • Even though I knew that women still tend to look about five months pregnant after giving birth, I’d never actually seen it for myself. Given that I’m due in four weeks, it’s really good to actually see a realistic post-birth body and know what to expect (as much as I can anyway!).

  • I haven’t had kids yet, but go Kate for creating healthy body images for the average woman. So many of us are misinformed of the expectations of what having a child is like because of the glossies in our society.Celebs with expensive nannies and PTs should take note!

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